RESEARCH makeup

Beginning in the 17th century and continuing throughout the 18th century, both men and women in England and France wore obvious cosmetics.  Gender differences were less important than class differences – cosmetics marked one as aristocratic and à la mode, and were adopted as well by those who were trying to rise in social status or become fashionable.  Makeup was not intended to look natural – in fact, it was called “paint” — but instead, “…to represent one’s aristocratic identity as declaratively as possible through cosmetic artifice” (Hyde).  Women and men showed their respectability and class through white skin, and heavy makeup was considered more respectable than naturally light skin.

Cosmetics also had practical aims – their use created what was considered an attractive face, and they could hide the effects of age, blemishes, disease, or sun.

The key aspects of the 18th century cosmetic look were a complexion somewhere between white and pale, red cheeks in a large circular shape (particularly for French court wear) or upside down triangle, and red lips.  There were two main cosmetics worn by most women and men:  blanc and rouge.

Although i looked at all the research i wanted my model to look like a modern version of the look one that can be used in a catwalk show or music video for these days. i will still use lighter makeup but modernise it. i will also use a heart beauty spot which indicated that a woman was taken/ married.

1769_Dance_QCharlotte Queen Charlotte who was black.

Young Woman in a White Hat 1780. By Jean Baptiste Unknown lady in natural makeup of the day.

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